December 2017
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Colonial Beekeepers Nuc Program – providing Virginia bees to Virginia beekeepers!
We have club beekeepers in our program with the goal of producing nucs for beekeepers interested in local honey bees.

So what is a NUC? A NUC is a small colony of bees (NUCleus colony) which is started from a fully developed hive. Another common term is a split. Most members will not start splitting hives until well into the nectar flow so the main hive honey production is not impacted severely. That is not a definite date...depends on weather. It then will take 4-6 weeks until the nuc is ready to sell/deliver. We are hoping to have nucs ready for purchase in late spring.....late in May into June or even later.

So here is how it works....The club nuc coordinator keeps a list of club nuc producers, a list of club members and a list non-members who wish to obtain a nuc or two (wannabees). We personally DO NOT have a stash of nucs in the freezer or in the back yard!!!!

When the "NUC Coordinator" is notified by a producer that a NUC is available for sale/delivery, he/she goes down the list of "club wannabees" and sends the producer a couple of names with contact info. The nuc producer will contact you directly via phone and/or email. It is very important that the buyer contact the producer as soon as possible after notification that a nuc is ready for pickup and make arrangements. Once again ....The "wannabee" will be notified and it is then that person's responsibility to get the NUC in a timely fashion.....most producers want it picked up in a day or two and they set the terms for pick up ....

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN SIGNING UP FOR A NUC, READ ON:

Nucs include:

  • 3 Frames of brood
  • 2 Frames of food stores
  • 1 Queen that laid the brood
  •  State Inspection

Prices:
Members

  • $125 for medium frame nuc (2017)
  • $135 for deep frame nuc (2017)

Non-members

  • $150 for medium frame nuc
  • $160 for deep frame nuc

Members Only
Over wintered nucs

  • $25 additional cost

We recommend that you take the Beginning Beekeepers Course and have a mentor assigned prior to receiving bees.

You can sign up for a maximum of two (2) nucs a year, but will only receive one at a time. As nucs become available, orders will be filled until everyone on the list gets one (1) nuc. If you have signed up for two (2) nucs, you will then be contacted to pick up your second nuc as they become available. We will fill member orders first and then non-member orders.

Please bring appropriate equipment including tiedowns and protective clothing when you pick up your bees, as you will be inspecting your nuc at that time.  Your responsibilities when you receive a nuc are to:

  • Bring your bee suit and hive tools so you can inspect the hive with the producer.
  • Bring your hive body (bottom board, box, inner cover, telescoping cover) with extra frames of foundation or comb to fill out your hive.
  • Bring devices to close off your hive entry(s), so bees don't escape during transport.
  • Bring Push pins to lock your bees/frames and to lock the entry device for transport.
  • Bring ratchet tie-down strap(s) for securing the hive for transport.

If you would like to be added to the Colonial Beekeepers nuc list, please email the following information to Cindy Myers at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. :

  • your name
  • telephone number
  • email address
  • number of nucs, 1 or 2
  • deep or medium frames
  • are you a CBA member?

If you have additional questions you can call Cindy at 719-306-3714.

 

 

 

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October Meetings
and Events

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October 17th
Monthly Meeting

 

October 21st
Getting Started in Beekeeping
Gloucester Library
10:00 am - 12:30 pm
Yorktown Library
2:00 pm - 4:45 pm

 

October 22nd
Getting Started in Beekeeping
Newport News Library
2:00 pm - 4:45 pm

 

October 28th
Getting Started in Beekeeping
Poquoson Library
2:00 pm - 4:45 pm

 

 

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November Meetings
and Events

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November 2nd
Basic Beekeeping Class - Day 1

 

November 4th
VSBA Fall Meeting

 

November 9th
Basic Beekeeping Class - Day 2

 

November 16th
Basic Beekeeping Class - Day 3

 

November 21st
Annual Holiday Dinner

 

 

Follow the "Upcoming Events" or "Latest News" link under the Main Menu for more information.

 

 

 

NewBees Corner

 

Information listed here is for the new beekeepers looking for new information and guidance on beekeeping and beekeeping chores:

 

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So you were able to harvest some honey but now what do you do with those frames? There are three things that can be done. 1-you could just leave the frames as they are and store them in a freezer or refrigerator. Not very practical for most folks and storing them wet in the garage or house is an invitation to disaster, don't do it! 2-you can let the bees dry them out outside of the hive. This works very well but you must take precautions to prevent a robbing frenzy in your apiary. Put the frames some distance from the hives, the farther the better, and additionally have some objects between, like trees or a building. This also pertains to letting the bees clean up your extracting equipment. There will be some damage to the comb but nothing too drastic. 3-lastly you can put the frames back into the hive they were harvested from or on another colony that may need the stores. If you just want the bees to dry the frames and move the residual honey down into the colony you can place the frames in a super above the inner cover. To keep the bees from moving up add a spacer or an empty super between the inner cover and the frames. Adding the frames back into or on top of a colony may also create a robbing situation if there are any gaps, cracks or openings. Take precautions!

Once dry these frames are a valuable resource and you HAVE to protect them until freezing weather arrives and wax moth activity ceases for the year. There are some choices that can be made here as well. Hanging under a eave allowing plenty of air and light can usually prevent wax moth damage if the combs never held brood or pollen. Follow this link to see some examples. Another way is to protect your frames with Para Dichlorobenzene, Moth crystals. Supers are stacked and sealed with a spacer at the top. Place the moth crystals on a paper plate on top in the space as the fumes will go down. Follow this link to read an article about wax moths and their control. Lastly combs can be protected with a natural microbial bacteria Bacillus thuringenisis (Certan®). It was once available for sale by bee supply companies but is no longer manufactured in the US but is available from Canada. Some beeks use alternative products that contain the same bacteria but are sold under a different name for the similar purpose of larva control. Here is a lnk to a video about the use of Certan.

Have you done your check for varroa mites? Now is a great time to do a sugar roll or alcohol wash to determine the percentage of mites within your colonies. Doesn't matter if you treat or not but to know your colonies health, it is important to monitor the varroa mite infestation level. Follow this link to learn how to do a sugar roll or this link to learn how to do an alcohol wash. Once you have your numbers then you can follow this link to determine a course of action. Just looking at your bees is not enough to know how they are coping with varroa. I just recently, with the help of a club member, did an alcohol wash on a colony that appeared to be in good shape. Weren't we both surprised when there were so many mites we had to dump them out on a rag to make an accurate count. 158 mites in 1/2 cup (300) of bees! Do I have a colony that is surviving with varroa or a colony that is on the brink of collapse? Without monitoring I wouldn't know why they perished or the importance of breeding this queen.

 

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The summer dirth has started and foraging bees are all looking for stores to bring back to their home hive. Don't let your hive become a source of stores for a neighboring colony! Use a robbing screen if you have a small colony or are feeding to grow your colony. Products like Honey B Healthy or added essential oils can drive foraging bees wild. They want that stuff! Know that a honey bee colony's worst enemy is a stronger honey bee colony, fact.

For information on Robbing Screens check out these links:
1. Robbing Screen article on the CBA website
2. Images for different varieties of robbing screens
A few video links on making robbing screens. (Something to remember is if you use an entrance reducer the width doesn't need to exactly match the bottom board, example: an 8 frame robbing screen will work on a ten frame hive with an entrance reducer!).
1. Northwest New Jersey Beekeepers(NWNJBA)
2. Country Rubes Beekeeping Supplies
3. Another Country Rubes Video
A Google search brings up plenty more videos!
Robbing Screen Videos

 

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Well the chances for colder weather are finnally behind us and the bees are busy. There are many things in bloom now and more to come. With all these resources the bees are ready to reproduce, SWARM! I've been doing my best to quell that desire by opening the brood nest and practicing nectar management but in some cases it just isn't enough. So if I see evidence of swarming: queen cups with eggs or larva visible or even capped queen cells. What do you do?

Here are some links for you to follow that give some practical advise. First is Michael Bush on why seeing queen cells isn't so bad and what to do and not to do. The second is a 22 page read that does a great job of explaining what could be going on in your hive. The pages that mimic Michael's answer are 13 & 14. There Are Queen Cells In My Hive-What Should I Do?. Lastly, here's a link to how you might transplant them to a queenless colony or make a nuc. Fat Beeman doesn't wear a veil, you should! Fat Beeman never says "it is my opinion" so take heed!  Queen Cell Transplant

The hive manipulations to consider as the nectar flow is on are "Opening the Broodnest" and "Nectar Management 101". If opening/expanding the brood nest I would caution to start slowly as you become familiar with the technique and get more aggressive later in April and May. Here we go!

Finally, so you have your new nuc or package bees, how do you grow them? Here's a link to a presentation of how to grow your bees into 3 boxes:Growing Nucs

 

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